Adoptions Attorney Leslie Barrows
Today is National Adoption Day in Tarrant County 
 

Below is a news release from ACH Child and Family Services about National Adoption Day today! Here at The Barrows Firm we are all very happy to participate in this wonderful annual event.

NEWS RELEASE

Contact:

Jill Anderson
Director of Marketing
jill.anderson@ACHservices.org
817.566.1624 (desk)      

For Immediate Release

Tarrant County Celebrates “Superhero” Families on Adoption Day

68 Children Will Join Their Forever Families this Friday

FORT WORTH, Texas (Nov. 16, 2016) – Every child dreams of seeing a superhero. But sometimes, they come in disguise. More than 100,000 children in the United States are waiting in foster care for an adoptive family. These families who open their hearts and homes to children who need permanent, loving forever families are truly superheroes.

In Tarrant County, 69 of those children will celebrate being officially adopted on Friday, Nov. 18 during Tarrant County Adoption Day. Proceedings will begin at 8:45 a.m. at the Tarrant County Family Law Center located on Weatherford Street in downtown Fort Worth.

National Adoption Day—scheduled for November 19 this year—is a collective effort to raise awareness for children in foster care waiting to find permanent, loving families. To help raise awareness and celebrate those being adopted, Tarrant County began holding an adoption day event in 2000. The effort was started by a small group of dedicated individuals whose goal was to celebrate the most exciting day in the lives of children in foster care—the day they join their forever families.

The first event was grassroots, and since then, it has grown into a day-long celebration. Children who are adopted on this day are given a new stuffed animal, book, superhero cape and a necklace engraved with their new name and date of adoption. Adoptive mothers receive a yellow rose, and adoptive fathers receive a framed and matted copy of their first official family photograph taken at the event.

Keeping with the superhero theme, the event welcomes about 25 adult volunteers who dress as super heroes, such as Captain America and Batman, to take photos and interact with the children.

“Tarrant County Adoption Day is one of hundreds events across the country promoting adoption and creating forever families for kids in foster care,” said Abbey Kirby, co-chair of the event committee this year and a Fort Worth attorney. “The smiles, laughter, and tears of joy at the event are all you need to see to understand how important this day is to each of the families and their children. It is a day they will never forget.”

About Tarrant County Adoption Day and Community Partners of Tarrant County

Tarrant County’s Adoption Day event exists under the umbrella of a 501(c)(3) organization called Community Partners of Tarrant County. This organization helps meet some of the emergency needs of children assisted by Child Protective Services (CPS), such as providing items like clothes, diapers, formula, car seats, etc. Money donated to Community Partners for Tarrant County Adoption Day is earmarked for use only at the annual event.

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Serving veterans in Tarrant County, pro-bono legal services 
 

November the 11th is Veterans Day. World War I formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918. While most of the world still observes this day as Armistice Day, in the U.S. we renamed and have celebrated Veterans Day, since 1954. In the U.S., we also honor our military veterans on Memorial Day, commemorating all those who died while in service. On Veterans Day, we honor all our members of the armed forces, including those who made it home, many of whom suffering from PTSD and other mental health and addiction problems. While our country has come a long way in caring for military veterans, we still have a long way to go.

We have come a long way in supporting veterans and we have much more work to do.

The Vietnam War or conflict, as it had been called, was a largely unpopular war here in the U.S. and there was much uprising and protest of U.S. involvement. When many of our troops came home, they were met with less than open arms from some. Not having the support of their nation made it very tough for surviving veterans. There were vet’s clubs but little other support. Today, by contrast, the attitudes have shifted and U.S. veterans receive respect from friends, family and members of their communities, despite opinion about the conditions under which they served our armed forces.

There are many charitable foundations actively supporting our wounded service men and women. We often see proudly decorated military at events all through the holiday season. The holidays can be difficult for veterans. Even though they are approached with respect and thankful sentiment, many live with enduring scaring and pain. As the holidays are fun and festive for many, some of our veterans are suffering with mental health and addiction problems. Too often these troubles lead to legal problems including DWI, domestic violence, unemployment and homelessness.

Services for veterans in Tarrant County, including pro-bono legal clinics, are available and need our support.

The Tarrant County legal community and several fine organizations work very diligently to provide affordable and free legal services to veterans in need of legal assistance. There are also court diversion programs, through which veteran offenders can get the help they need to be well and may receive deferred prosecutions of certain offenses, so long as they work with a structured program, designed to help them get to a place where they will kick the problems haunting their lives.

The Tarrant County chapter of Texas Lawyers for Texas Veterans, a non-profit group, was launched in 2010 and to date has served more than 1,500 veterans. The demand for help continues increasing. At the Tarrant County clinics, a veteran can get a free legal consultation regardless of income. Volunteer attorneys who appreciate the sacrifices, some of whom are also veterans, understand how important it is to help the men and women who served our country in the many conflicts and wars, some of which are ongoing. In a KERA article, “Tarrant County Legal Clinic Helps Veterans,” there is a nice write up and imbedded audio story on point.

To learn more about the Texas Lawyers for Texas Veterans, Tarrant County Chapter, you may visit their website and find them on Facebook and Twitter. See also a promotional video.

The Barrows Firm shares important information and legal resources for veterans. If you need assistance with a matter involving a veteran in need of help, The Barrows Firm can direct you to the right people and organizations.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

 

October is National Domestic Violence Month 
 

In 2015, there were 192,872 incidents of family violence in Texas, and 158 women were killed. There were 183,294 domestic violence hotline calls. While 24,391 adults and children were safely sheltered, the statistics tell us 15,869 requests for shelter were unmet.[i] In some cases, victims of domestic violence can make and carry out a plan to get away from their abuser, but in far too many others, there is no time to prepare until it is too late. With increased education and awareness of domestic violence, people have a better chance of identifying abusive behaviors and the signs that problems are escalating. In any emergency situation, the best bet is to have a plan and hope you never need it.

Texas law recognizes and protects men, women and children.

Men, women and children, at all ages, and from all walks of life, can be family violence victims. Texas law defines family violence as well as dating violence, and it is important to recognize that you do not need to be married to be protected by Texas law.

Family violence is defined in the Texas Family Code as:

“(1) An act by a member of a family or household against another member of the family or household that is intended to result in physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or sexual assault or that is a threat that reasonably places the member in fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or sexual assault, but does not include defensive measures to protect oneself;

(2) abuse, as that term is defined by Sections 261.001(1)(C), (E), (G), (H), (I), (J), and (K), by a member of a family or household toward a child of the family or household; or

(3) dating violence, as that term is defined by Section 71.0021.[ii]

When an individual reports family violence to a law enforcement officer, either during an incident when they dial 911, or soon after, the Texas Criminal Code requires that officers investigate all disturbance reports. In the process, the officer must notify a victim about their rights as victims of family violence. These rights include the request for a protective order from the court, and the right to ask a local prosecutor to file a criminal complaint against the abuser.[iii]

When the reports and records are filed with the court, a judge can make a finding that family violence is or is likely to occur, and issue a protective order that legally prohibits the accused person from engaging in certain acts and may restrict the distance and contact among the accused and potential violence victims. If the accused violates the protective order, they may be immediately arrested and taken to jail. A protective order, while something of leverage, is not a bullet proof vest, and victims should be on heightened alert and maintain a plan in the event of an emergency.

Spotting the signs that point to a family violence threat is important to making safe choices.

Abusers focus on their ability to control their victims. An abuser may act hostile or threatening during verbal fights. They may apologize profusely and have many reasons for their inappropriate anger. So long as they can contain the situation and keep it private, the abuser maintains control. If, however, an upset spouse or significant other seeks attention from other people, especially family members, the abuser may become more angered. An abusive person might move a family great distances from the ones to whom they may run, in the event of an emergency. Abusers may also monitor others’ use of cell phones and other communication technologies to keep an eye on or limit communication outside the abuser’s control. When people are isolated from friends and family they can feel trapped and powerless.

When do people snap? When are we once bitten, twice shy? These are difficult questions for anyone to answer. A better question is whether we feel absolutely safe or wonder if someone is going to lose it and what may happen. In cases involving serious injury and death, the victims did not always see an attack coming, until it was too late.

Where do people go when they leave, and what do they do if they have no money?

Since many abusers actively limit their victims access to personal and financial support, it can be difficult to leave. Some victims find a way to save an emergency fund of money, possibly in cash or untraceable pre-paid debit cards. Some victims with no family or friends with whom to take shelter, may use the computer at the local library to look for safe places to go. While some victims fear their abuser might look for them at local shelters, some find underground or privately networked safe homes.

It may be an interesting conversation among friends and family to talk about what they might do to escape a violent relationship and where they would go. Everything down to avoiding social media may be part of a plan of action. Even people in the best relationships are wise to realize that someday they might have to escape an abuser or help a victim escape theirs. Knowing where to turn and who to call can include the name and number of a family law attorney who can help victims take action and safety measures. Including that attorney in a “what if” conversation may not be a bad idea.

Remember, if you sense or see something, discretely inquire or say something. You might fear that saying something may offend your friend or family member, but in the event you are correct, speaking up and just letting another know you are there whenever they may need you can save a life.

The Barrows Firm shares important information and resources about family law. If you need assistance with a matter involving family violence, The Barrows Firm can help answer your questions.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] Texas Council on Family Violence, 2015 Family Violence by the Numbers.

[ii] Texas Family Code, Section 71.004, Family Violence.

[iii] Texas Criminal Code, Chapter 5, Family Violence Prevention.

The Barrows Firm Sponsors Southlake Oktoberfest 2016 
 

FORT WORTH – Oct. 7, 2016 –The Barrows Firm, P.C. in Fort Worth, Texas, is a contributing sponsor of Southlake Oktoberfest 2016, offered by the Southlake Chamber of Commerce on October 7 – 9, 2016 at Southlake Town Square.

Oktoberfest is a seasonal signature event for the Southlake Chamber. Leslie Barrows is a member of the Southlake Chamber where she is also on the board of directors. In connection with The Barrows Firm sponsorship of the Oktoberfest event, the firm produced a public service announcement video that will be featured in rotation with videos by other sponsors.

The Barrows Firm Oktoberfest PSA video reminds festival attendees to plan ahead for the event by choosing a designated driver, planning ahead to meet at a certain time and place if you get separated from your group, and being aware of your surroundings with the well-known suggestion that if you see something, say something.

Click/tap here to watch the video

“How to speak Texan in German” is a focus of The Barrows Firm video that translates popular phrases and sayings from Texan to German, including “Howdy y’all,” “Good morning,” “Evening y’all,” “Bye now,” “How about them Cowboys,” “Fixin to,” “Hissy fit,” “Do you speak English?” and “Don’t mess with Texas.”

The Southlake Chamber of Commerce website dedicated to its Oktoberfest event states that this is the 15th anniversary of the Oktoberfest being hosted by the Chamber. Located at the Southlake Town Square, 100,000 people are expected to visit throughout the weekend. Parking and admission are free and the event takes place Friday, October 7, 2016 from 5 p.m. and runs through Sunday, October 9, 2016 at 5 p.m. On Friday and Saturday evening, Southlake Oktoberfest is open until 11 p.m.

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About The Barrows Firm

The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center. If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and on Avvo.com.

Leslie Barrows Named Top Attorney by Fort Worth, Texas Magazine 
 

FORT WORTH – Sept. 29, 2016 – Attorney Leslie Barrows, founder and managing attorney at The Barrows Firm, P.C. in Fort Worth, Texas, was named again as a Top Attorney in the 2016 list of Top Attorneys by Fort Worth, Texas magazine.

Fort Worth, Texas magazine publishes an annual list of “Top Attorneys.” The list of Top Attorneys is drawn from nominations by other attorneys in Tarrant County, Texas and goes through a rigorous panel to assure the highest of quality is met. A few attorneys are listed in more than one category of practice, based on the nominations received. Leslie Barrows is named as a Top Attorney under the Specialty of Family Law, including divorce and custody matters.

The December 2016 issue of Fort Worth, Texas magazine, circulated among area residents, will include the 15th annual list of “Top Attorneys.”. The issue will also be given to guests attending charity events and galas including, Grand Entry Gala, Jewel Charity Ball, Presbyterian Night Shelters “22nd Annual Christmas Gala,” TCU College of Fine Arts Gala, Texas Health Harris’ Breakfast with St. NICUlas and Cariety’s Celebrity Cutting.

Attorney Leslie Barrows is an active member of the Fort Worth legal community and serves as a member or director on numerous legal and business organizations in Tarrant County, Texas. Barrows is known among her peers as a strong advocate for her clients. “Family law is difficult, there is no doubt about it.  No one wants to lose, not everyone can win – and the stakes are always high.  Our stance is to just win,” Barrows stated.

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About The Barrows Firm

The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center. If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and on Avvo.com.

The Barrows Firm Sponsors Komen Greater Fort Worth Breast Cancer Fundraiser 
 

FORT WORTH – Sept. 27, 2016 –The Barrows Firm, P.C. in Fort Worth, Texas, is a contributing sponsor of Kick Up Your Heels for the Cure, benefiting Susan G. Komen Greater Fort Worth.

The Barrows Firm is helping increase awareness about breast cancer and research for cures, by supporting the upcoming fundraising event, Kick Up Your Heels for the Cure, benefiting the Susan G. Komen Greater Fort Worth organization.

Komen Greater Fort Worth has invested $23 million in community breast health programs in four counties and has helped contribute to more than $800 million invested globally in research. The $1,500 donation by The Barrows Firm supports Komen Greater Fort Worth in their mission to save lives and end breast cancer forever by empowering others, ensuring quality care for all and energizing science to find cures.

Founder of The Barrows Firm, Attorney Leslie Barrows stated, “The Susan G. Komen Greater Fort Worth is hardworking organization and they do a great job raising awareness about breast cancer,” Barrows said. “Brest cancer has affected so many women and men in our community. I believe that we need to support research to find a cure for breast cancer.”

This year’s Kick Up Your Heels for the Cure is an “evening under the stars” theme featuring dinner by Capital Grille, Railhead Smokehouse and entertainment by Green River Ordinance. The event takes place Sept. 20, 2016 at 7:30 p.m. at the Heart of the Ranch at Clearfork in Fort Worth, Texas.

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About The Barrows Firm

The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center. If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and on Avvo.com.

PODCAST: Texas AFCC and Conflict Resolution in Family Law with Attorney Leslie Barrows 
 

The Barrows Firm Law Review is a monthly Internet radio show podcast featuring information about Texas family, criminal, juvenile, probate and estate planning law and events. Attorney Leslie Barrows is our featured guest today as she shares insight and information about the Texas Chapter of the Association of Family and Conciliatory Courts (AFCC) and the use of alternative dispute resolution in family law matters.

Texas AFCC and Conflict Resolution in Family Law with Attorney Leslie Barrows

  • What is the purpose of the Association of Family and Conciliatory Courts?
  • How can attorneys use alternative dispute resolution in traditional litigation matters?
  • What flexibility do people and their lawyers have in creative conflict resolution?
  • Why does the Texas Chapter of the AFCC include multidisciplinary professionals?
  • What are some highlights of the 2016 Statewide Conference of Texas AFCC in Fort Worth this November 2-4?

Leslie Barrows is the principal founder of The Barrows Firm in Fort Worth, Texas. In her firm’s main practice areas of family law, criminal defense and juvenile law, Leslie is consistently challenged with dynamic cases and clients. When winning is what matters, many in the Fort Worth area go to The Barrows Firm based on their reputation an winning track record over the past decade. Leslie Barrows earned her undergraduate degree from Sam Houston State University and she earned her law degree from the Oklahoma City University School of Law. She is a member of numerous organizations primarily focused in Tarrant County.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

Should “Cyberbullying” be a crime in Texas? 
 

 

The First Amendment to the United States Constitution prohibits the making of any law respecting an establishment of religion, abridging the freedom of speech, infringing on the freedom of the press, interfering with the right to peaceably assemble, or prohibiting the petitioning for a governmental redress of grievances. Since its adoption on December 15, 1791, legal opinions interpreting the First Amendment identify freedom of speech in several forms in addition to spoken words. From speaking, to writing to the message on an article of clothing, there are many forms of protected speech.

As well as there are many forms of free speech, there are exceptions to the prohibition against free speech. Yelling “Fire” in a public place, inciting a riot, making false statements of fact, obscenity, fighting words and offensive speech in certain contexts have historically been held as speech not protected by the First Amendment. In fact, there are times in U.S. history, particularly following World War I, when speech critical of the U.S. government and speech aligned with enemy governments and groups was certainly not protected speech.

In current times and with the rise of technology, millions of Texans use social media and text messaging to communicate and express themselves. While many proclaim, “I’ll say what I want, and it’s my First Amendment right,” others disagree and want new laws limiting free speech in the context of “Cyberbullying.”

Texas Senator, Jose Menendez[i], wants a law protecting against online bullying, a law that could limit First Amendment rights to free speech.

The proposed legislation is called “David’s Law,” named after a 16-year-old boy who committed suicide earlier this year. David was bullied online. While many adults grew up learning the phrase, “sticks and stones may break my bones, but words will never hurt me,” many children today were raised in a climate of “political correctness” where words hurt more than ever.

The technology available to bullies today is notably compelling compared to that in past generations. Where bulling used to be more of a one-on-one or small group experience, today the bully can take pictures, record videos, make memes and otherwise launch a media attack on another child. Imagine how difficult this is for adults in politics, now consider the opportunity for a child to respond and say that “words don’t hurt.”

The scope of Senator Menendez’ bill is limited to the acts of electronic harassing or bullying anyone under the age of 18 through text messages, social media, websites or apps. A violation of the law would be a misdemeanor.

Balancing protection of students with free speech requires we remember, these are kids.

Students learning civics in school understand they have rights. What they do not necessarily understand is the notion that while they have rights, they have a children’s version and do not have a full set of rights until they reach adulthood.

The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled on the boundaries of free speech and similarly to the exception in which you may not yell “fire” in a crowded theater, and you cannot make threats against another person’s life and defended it as free speech, maybe engaging in cyberbullying against a minor should also be an exception to the right of free speech. According to the Cyberbullying Research Center[ii], 17 states in the U.S. have made cyberbullying a crime, not protected by the First Amendment.

Will Cyberbullying laws stand up to constitutional scrutiny and slippery slope challenges?

While the U.S. Supreme Court has ruled on cases involving free speech and conduct giving rise to the finding of an exception to the right of free speech, the issue of cyberbullying has not been addressed by the high court.

A challenge may be in defining exactly what speech and conduct gives rise to cyberbullying and how it is defined as a crime. This is similar to obscenity laws and the challenge in determining what is obscene based on community standards versus what some may say is art or free speech.

Additional questions are those of precedent. If the U.S. Supreme Court makes cyberbullying a crime, how expansive will the range of conduct be which gives rise to a criminal charge? Will offended adults in the workplace seek similar protections? Will there be time, place and manner restrictions on cyberbullying?

So long as communication technologies continue progressing, there will be challenges for parents, teachers and children with competing ideas, values and cultures. As legislation affecting Texas families is debated, The Barrows Firm will share available information and ask the questions to which we may be far from answers.

The Barrows Firm shares important information and resources about criminal and juvenile law. If you need assistance with a matter involving criminal defense or juvenile law, The Barrows Firm can help answer your questions.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] Senator Jose Menendez serves Texas Senate District 26, located in Bexar County.

[ii] Cyberbullying Research Center, search: “Laws”

Becoming a foster parent and adopting children who need a forever loving home 
 

There are many young children in Texas who are waiting to be adopted, and most of them are in the foster care system. In years past, movies and television programs often depicted youngsters living in group orphanage homes. In reality, most children are placed with foster parents when they are no longer in the care and custody of their natural parents. One reason children are removed from birth parents is the presence of drugs or alcohol at birth, at which time the Texas Department of Family and Protective Services (DFPS) may remove the child, and place them in foster care. Domestic violence and other criminal matters can lead to children being removed from a birth parent and placed in foster care. While some children remain for an extended time with foster parents, the arrangement is not permanent, unless the foster parent chooses to adopt the child.

People who know they want to adopt, may find out becoming a foster parent is a great first step.

In Texas, the foster parent program is a good starting point for people who want to adopt a child. There are many benefits to becoming a foster parent. Especially if you have not had children before, becoming a foster parent can help you learn more about your parenting style and how to adapt to life with children before you make a forever commitment to adopt a child.

The first step in becoming a foster parent in Texas is to attend an informational meeting where you learn the requirements of being a foster or adoptive parent. Generally, you must be at least 21 years old, financially stable and a responsible mature adult.

Extensive training and education helps prepare people to become foster parents.[i]

After the informational meeting and application process with DFPS, if you are selected to proceed in the process you will be invited to meet with DFPS staff to talk about becoming a foster parent. Next you will attend a training course through DFPS as well as completing the Parent Resource Information Development Education (PRIDE) course. Applicants to become foster parents must also complete any additional training required by the state, including universal precautions training, psychotropic medication training, and First Aid and CPR training.

A final step in becoming a foster parent is the family home study, where a caseworker from DFPS will visit with you in your home and discuss personal histories and family interests. The caseworker will be interested in learning your existing childcare experience and how you are best able to meet the needs of a child. The caseworker prepares a report based on their recommendations after the family home study and may suggest a child who may be the best match for your family.

Adopt your foster child when you are ready to make the forever commitment.

After you are approved as a foster parent and have been matched with a foster child and things have been going well, you can apply to adopt your foster child by filing an adoption petition with the court. Adoption petitions involving currently placed foster children and parents are relatively quick and easy. Once you adopt a foster child you can obtain new vital records such as a social security number and birth certificate once the adoption is approved and ordered by the court at the final adoption hearing.

While you do not necessarily need an attorney to represent you through the process of becoming a foster parent, it may be helpful, especially if you are concerned about any wrinkles along the way. After being placed with a foster child with whom the bond develops your attorney will lead you through the filing of an adoption petition and a final hearing.

The Barrows Firm shares important information and resources about the foster parent and adoption process. If you need more information about becoming a foster or adoptive parent, The Barrows Firm can help answer your additional questions.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] Texas Department of Family and Protective Services, Steps to Become a Foster/Adoptive Parent

The Barrows Firm Law Review – Recent Podcasts 
 

The Barrows Firm Law Review is a monthly Internet radio show podcast featuring information about Texas family, criminal, juvenile, probate and estate planning law and events. Attorney Leslie Barrows is our featured attorney guest host who tells us what happens and what we can expect in a variety of situations we might encounter.

From adoption and birth to death and probate tax, Leslie helps us all make sure our ducks are in a row. On this program we dispel myths and the grocery store line tales of what happens in divorce or DWI defense. Every month you can expect a fresh topic on our program as well as local news and legal industry events in and around Fort Worth and Tarrant County.

Listen to a few of our recent shows this year and feel free to click a share or like button to let your friends and family know about little law firm with a big impact on the lives of many. If you are looking for a stuffy conversation you have found the wrong show. The Barrows Firm Law Review is real, it’s friendly and funny at times when humor helps us all tackle tough situations.

How to tune in and listen to our program anytime:

To listen to one of our recent programs, simply click on the title below and you will be directed to that program in The Barrows Firm blog, The Captain’s Log. There will be a play button you can click to listen. The episodes are about 30 minutes long for your listening convenience.

 

Recent Barrows Firm Law Review Podcasts

Juvenile Law Podcast: Affluenza Teen case

  • The juvenile court system and how it differs from adult court
  • The rationale of the Affluenza defense, was it good in theory but may have failed in this case
  • How probation works and what happens how people run into problems
  • When is it most likely an individual is pulled from the juvenile system into adult court
  • Impressions about the Affluenza Teen case and what we can learn

 

Financial issues in divorce and family law

  • Financial disclosures and the discovery process in divorce and family law
  • Asset evaluations and classifications of joint marital or separate individual property
  • Income issues and determinations in divorce, child support, other family law matters
  • Tax issues in divorce including filing status, claiming dependent exemptions, negotiating tax issues and liabilities
  • Updating your will, estate planning documents and insurance policies after a divorce

 

Involuntary mental health commitments

  • Mental health and care needs at various ages and circumstances
  • Describing the facilities and care options available to individuals
  • Texas law, Mental Health Code and Code of Criminal Procedure
  • Approaching mental health commitments for short-term reasons
  • Long-term considerations for mental health commitments
  • Steps to take when considering taking action in seeking a commitment

 

Summer time possession schedules

  • What is summer time possession schedule and how is it addressed in the Texas Family Code?
  • When is it a good time to work on getting a summer time possession schedule in place?
  • Can I use the summer time possession schedule from last year, or can we modify it?
  • How can I enforce the summer time possession schedule if the other parent ignores it?
  • What do I say to my child asking questions about the summer and I do not know what to say?

 

Domestic Violence: Southlake and McKinney shootings

  • Personal protection and safety when you realize there is a domestic violence risk
  • Safety and security during divorce and family law cases, avoiding threats of violence
  • Could a protective order help save the women in Southlake or McKinney?
  • Preventing domestic violence in the courtroom, what steps can be taken
  • Responding to domestic violence and what to do if things go horribly wrong

 

Texas DPS and interaction with law enforcement

  • What to do when you encounter Texas DPS and other law enforcement, attitude is everything
  • Texas DPS and their role in law enforcement and the suspension or revocation of licenses
  • New surcharge waiver program with DPS and options to clear drivers licenses
  • Legal issues in addition to DWI that can affect your Texas driver’s license
  • Restoration of your Texas driver’s license and how a lawyer can help you in the process

 

Leslie Barrows is the principal founder of The Barrows Firm in Fort Worth, Texas. In her firm’s main practice areas of family law, criminal defense and juvenile law, Leslie is consistently challenged with dynamic cases and clients. When winning is what matters, many in the Fort Worth area go to The Barrows Firm based on their reputation an winning track record over the past decade. Leslie Barrows earned her undergraduate degree from Sam Houston State University and she earned her law degree from the Oklahoma City University School of Law. She is a member of numerous organizations primarily focused in Tarrant County.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center. You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter and Facebook.