Adoptions Attorney Leslie Barrows
Spousal maintenance in Texas divorce cases 
 

One of the scariest thoughts when contemplating divorce is, “How am I going to pay to live?” Now, imagine that you are the spouse who has no idea a divorce is in your future. When both spouses work, and earn sufficient income to support themselves, spousal maintenance may be less of an immediate concern and more a matter of fairness and equity. It is important to note that spousal maintenance and child support are two very separate legal and financial issues. If a divorcing spouse requests maintenance in their petition for dissolution, the court will apply a set of factors to weigh and determine if, how long and how much spousal maintenance is proper to award. Note that in most cases, maintenance is designed to be temporary, while the spouse receiving maintenance prepares to be self-supporting on their own.

Eligibility for maintenance

In an active divorce case where the court has proper jurisdiction over the parties, the court considers whether, “the spouse seeking maintenance will lack sufficient property, including the spouse’s separate property, on dissolution of the marriage to provide for the spouse’s minimum reasonable needs.[i]” The court will also consider any allegations of family violence as well as the length of the marriage and whether the spouse seeking maintenance cares for a child with disabilities.

Factors in determining maintenance

Once the court determines a spouse is eligible to receive maintenance, the court shall determine the nature, amount, duration and manner of periodic payments. The following is a general list of factors for a court to consider:

  • Ability to financially support oneself;
  • Education, training and job skills;
  • The length of the marriage;
  • Age and employability of the spouse;
  • Bad or fraudulent acts of a spouse;
  • Contribution to spouse’s education;
  • Property brought to the marriage;
  • Contribution as a homemaker;
  • Contribution to spouse’s education;
  • Marital misconduct, family violence, and more.

Duration of a maintenance order

After reviewing maintenance eligibility and factors, the next step is to determine how long. Courts may order spousal maintenance to continue for no longer than five, seven or 10 years after the date of the award. The court considers the factors above in determining duration of a maintenance order. The goal is to provide a recipient spouse maintenance, for “the shortest reasonable period that allows the spouse seeking maintenance to earn sufficient income to provide for the spouse’s minimum reasonable needs, unless the ability of the spouse to provide for the spouse’s minimum reasonable needs is substantially or totally diminished…[ii]

Amount of maintenance

In Texas, there is a maximum amount of spousal maintenance a spouse can be ordered to pay. The order may not exceed $5,000 or 20 percent of the spouse’s average monthly gross income.[iii] In determining gross income to calculate the amount of maintenance there are a list of factors in the Texas Family Code to be applied. When the court approves an income withholding order, the amount of maintenance is automatically withheld from one spouse and directed to the other.

Modification and termination and enforcement of maintenance orders

Spousal maintenance orders shall automatically terminate when a recipient spouse remarries or there is a death of either spouse. Maintenance is also terminable with a court hearing if the recipient spouse is in a cohabitating relationship with another. Maintenance orders are modifiable with a hearing and proof of a substantial change in circumstances. To enforce a maintenance order when a spouse fails to pay can also require a court hearing and a possible finding of contempt of court for failure to keep a maintenance obligation.

This article is intended to be a very basic overview of the issues involved in determining who may receive spousal maintenance and for how long and in what amount. Please consult The Barrows Firm for more information.

The Barrows Firm can provide additional information and resources on temporary and indefinite child support for minor and adult children with disabilities.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] Tex Fam Code Sec. 8.051

[ii] Tex Fam Code Sec. 8.054(2)

[iii] Tex Fam Code Sec. 8.055

A bill to eliminate no-fault divorce in Texas 
 

In his effort to reverse a trend of negative effects of divorce on families, observed by Rep. Matt Krause, R-Fort Worth, a one-page bill, filed in the current legislative session, would remove no-fault divorces from the Texas Family Code. The bill has been meet with both praise and criticism, prompting thoughtful discussion about marriage and divorce. There are several sides and points of view in a discussion about no-fault divorce. The Centers for Disease Control, keeping vital records on point, indicates three out of every seven Texas marriages end in divorce.[i]

Pleading grounds for a divorce in Texas

In Texas, you must allege grounds for divorce, one of which and the most commonly used is the no-fault ground of insupportability. When pleading insupportability, you are alleging conditions are unendurable, insufferable and intolerable. You do not need to prove the insupportability was anyone’s fault, it just is what it is, and you and your spouse will likely split the community marital estate 50/50 and be on your way. Does no-fault divorce make it very easy for one party to end the marriage, unilaterally? Absolutely. If you remove the no-fault provision, are you forcing someone to stay married against their will? That is an argument you are likely to hear in opposition of this bill.

The opponents to this bill argue that divorce cases will be more expensive to litigate if there are contested grounds. If you remove the no-fault provision, you are left to either decide or litigate as to who is at fault. There are several fault grounds that would remain on the books, even if no-fault is abolished.

Remaining grounds for divorce, aside from insupportability (no-fault):

  1. Adultery;
  2. Abandonment;
  3. Cruelty;
  4. Felony conviction;
  5. Confinement in mental hospital;
  6. Living apart for more than three years.

Without the no-fault grounds, you or your spouse must agree on who is at fault or take your changes litigating the fault-based grounds for divorce. Opponents of the current bill suggest that people with financial limitations may not afford to hire a lawyer and get a divorce, they may not be able to defend their case without a lawyer, and the may be stuck in a bad marriage with no way out.

Some may agree it is too easy to get divorced and throw in the towel

On the other hand, proponents of removing the no-fault ground for divorce may tell you that making it more difficult to get a divorce (including financially), can help couples work harder at reconciling conflict. Supporters of this bill may also tell you about research findings that among people who were divorced, many participants asked, reported that they regret not trying harder to resolve conflict, and regretting an impulsive decision to ask for a divorce.

Why is it in the heat of passion we can say we want a divorce and believe that uttering those words mean that you and your spouse have passed the point of no return. For those who feel strongly about the sanctity of marriage and the idea that people are too quick to make impulsive decisions, a more difficult road to divorce may help save more marriages.

Meanwhile, even those who feel very strongly about marriage and working it out, might also agree that taking the no-fault grounds away feels like the enslaving of your spouse with no way out. While there is support for and against this bill, there is an opportunity to listen and learn. We may consider the legislative history behind the addition of no-fault divorce in Texas.

Of course, as there are developments in this piece of legislation and other similarly relevant news, The Barrows Firm will certainly share it with you all.

The Barrows Firm shares important information and legal resources for veterans. If you need assistance with a matter involving a veteran in need of help, The Barrows Firm can direct you to the right people and organizations.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] KXAN, Texas lawmaker hopes to keep couples together, ending ‘no-fault’ divorces. By Phil Prazan, Dec. 27, 2016.

Update: Craig VanDeWege returns to Tarrant County 
 

FORT WORTH – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

“Craig VanDeWege is in the Tarrant County Jail. The case has been assigned to the Tarrant County 372nd District Court Judge Scott Wisch. Craig’s legal team has met with him and continues their own investigation.”

Statement by Leslie Starr Barrows, an attorney representing Craig VanDeWege

About The Barrows Firm

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

Attorney Statement re: Craig Vandewege 
 

FORT WORTH – FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

“Attorney Steve Gordon of Steve Gordon & Associates in Fort Worth, Texas has travelled to Colorado to meet with our client to discuss extradition issues. Meanwhile, we have begun our own independent investigation into the deaths of Shanna and Diederik. Their funerals will take place this coming Tuesday. Now, we respectfully request that everyone interested in this matter, please allow the families time and space to privately grieve during this especially difficult time for these families also observing Christmas and Hanukkah.” Attorney Leslie Barrows of The Barrows Firm in Fort Worth, Texas.

As an update to the original statement, Barrows stated, “Craig has waived extradition and will be transported back to Texas by law enforcement.”

Statement by Leslie Starr Barrows, an attorney representing Craig VanDeWege

About The Barrows Firm

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

PODCAST: Right to due process of law in a criminal case, with Attorney Leslie Barrows 
 

This is The Barrows Firm Law Review, a monthly Internet radio show podcast featuring information about Texas law and events that affect families and the community of attorneys and professionals who serve them. Attorney Leslie Barrows is our featured guest today as she shares insight and information about our 5th and 14th Amendment right to due process of law and reminds us that we are all innocent until proven guilty by a court of law.

Right to due process of law in a criminal case, with Attorney Leslie Barrows

  • What “innocent until proven guilty” means in a criminal case?
  • The criminal justice process from investigation to arrest and trial
  • Right to due process of law is protected by the 5th and 14th Amendments
  • Due process applies to life, liberty and property
  • What happens if your procedural due process rights are violated?

Leslie Barrows is the principal founder of The Barrows Firm in Fort Worth, Texas. In her firm’s main practice areas of family law, criminal defense and juvenile law, Leslie is consistently challenged with dynamic cases and clients. When winning is what matters, many in the Fort Worth area go to The Barrows Firm based on their reputation and winning track record over the past decade. Leslie Barrows earned her undergraduate degree from Sam Houston State University and she earned her law degree from the Oklahoma City University School of Law. She is a member of numerous organizations primarily focused in Tarrant County.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

PODCAST: 2016 Holiday Survival Tips with Attorney Leslie Barrows 
 

The Barrows Firm Law Review is a monthly Internet radio show podcast featuring information about Texas family, criminal, juvenile, probate and estate planning law and events. Attorney Leslie Barrows is our featured guest today as she shares insight and information about how to survive the holiday season with so many challenges on friends and families as people face challenges involving family law, criminal law and estate planning.

2016 Holiday Survival Tips with Attorney Leslie Barrows

  • No refusal weekends: Your expectations, rights and recourse under Texas law
  • How to make it through holiday celebrations and parties in high conflict families
  • Addressing the needs of aging relatives and being sensitive about estate planning
  • Creating new traditions and new expectations and families grow and change

Leslie Barrows is the principal founder of The Barrows Firm in Fort Worth, Texas. In her firm’s main practice areas of family law, criminal defense and juvenile law, Leslie is consistently challenged with dynamic cases and clients. When winning is what matters, many in the Fort Worth area go to The Barrows Firm based on their reputation and winning track record over the past decade. Leslie Barrows earned her undergraduate degree from Sam Houston State University and she earned her law degree from the Oklahoma City University School of Law. She is a member of numerous organizations primarily focused in Tarrant County.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

Today is National Adoption Day in Tarrant County 
 

Below is a news release from ACH Child and Family Services about National Adoption Day today! Here at The Barrows Firm we are all very happy to participate in this wonderful annual event.

NEWS RELEASE

Contact:

Jill Anderson
Director of Marketing
jill.anderson@ACHservices.org
817.566.1624 (desk)      

For Immediate Release

Tarrant County Celebrates “Superhero” Families on Adoption Day

68 Children Will Join Their Forever Families this Friday

FORT WORTH, Texas (Nov. 16, 2016) – Every child dreams of seeing a superhero. But sometimes, they come in disguise. More than 100,000 children in the United States are waiting in foster care for an adoptive family. These families who open their hearts and homes to children who need permanent, loving forever families are truly superheroes.

In Tarrant County, 69 of those children will celebrate being officially adopted on Friday, Nov. 18 during Tarrant County Adoption Day. Proceedings will begin at 8:45 a.m. at the Tarrant County Family Law Center located on Weatherford Street in downtown Fort Worth.

National Adoption Day—scheduled for November 19 this year—is a collective effort to raise awareness for children in foster care waiting to find permanent, loving families. To help raise awareness and celebrate those being adopted, Tarrant County began holding an adoption day event in 2000. The effort was started by a small group of dedicated individuals whose goal was to celebrate the most exciting day in the lives of children in foster care—the day they join their forever families.

The first event was grassroots, and since then, it has grown into a day-long celebration. Children who are adopted on this day are given a new stuffed animal, book, superhero cape and a necklace engraved with their new name and date of adoption. Adoptive mothers receive a yellow rose, and adoptive fathers receive a framed and matted copy of their first official family photograph taken at the event.

Keeping with the superhero theme, the event welcomes about 25 adult volunteers who dress as super heroes, such as Captain America and Batman, to take photos and interact with the children.

“Tarrant County Adoption Day is one of hundreds events across the country promoting adoption and creating forever families for kids in foster care,” said Abbey Kirby, co-chair of the event committee this year and a Fort Worth attorney. “The smiles, laughter, and tears of joy at the event are all you need to see to understand how important this day is to each of the families and their children. It is a day they will never forget.”

About Tarrant County Adoption Day and Community Partners of Tarrant County

Tarrant County’s Adoption Day event exists under the umbrella of a 501(c)(3) organization called Community Partners of Tarrant County. This organization helps meet some of the emergency needs of children assisted by Child Protective Services (CPS), such as providing items like clothes, diapers, formula, car seats, etc. Money donated to Community Partners for Tarrant County Adoption Day is earmarked for use only at the annual event.

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Serving veterans in Tarrant County, pro-bono legal services 
 

November the 11th is Veterans Day. World War I formally ended at the 11th hour of the 11th day of the 11th month of 1918. While most of the world still observes this day as Armistice Day, in the U.S. we renamed and have celebrated Veterans Day, since 1954. In the U.S., we also honor our military veterans on Memorial Day, commemorating all those who died while in service. On Veterans Day, we honor all our members of the armed forces, including those who made it home, many of whom suffering from PTSD and other mental health and addiction problems. While our country has come a long way in caring for military veterans, we still have a long way to go.

We have come a long way in supporting veterans and we have much more work to do.

The Vietnam War or conflict, as it had been called, was a largely unpopular war here in the U.S. and there was much uprising and protest of U.S. involvement. When many of our troops came home, they were met with less than open arms from some. Not having the support of their nation made it very tough for surviving veterans. There were vet’s clubs but little other support. Today, by contrast, the attitudes have shifted and U.S. veterans receive respect from friends, family and members of their communities, despite opinion about the conditions under which they served our armed forces.

There are many charitable foundations actively supporting our wounded service men and women. We often see proudly decorated military at events all through the holiday season. The holidays can be difficult for veterans. Even though they are approached with respect and thankful sentiment, many live with enduring scaring and pain. As the holidays are fun and festive for many, some of our veterans are suffering with mental health and addiction problems. Too often these troubles lead to legal problems including DWI, domestic violence, unemployment and homelessness.

Services for veterans in Tarrant County, including pro-bono legal clinics, are available and need our support.

The Tarrant County legal community and several fine organizations work very diligently to provide affordable and free legal services to veterans in need of legal assistance. There are also court diversion programs, through which veteran offenders can get the help they need to be well and may receive deferred prosecutions of certain offenses, so long as they work with a structured program, designed to help them get to a place where they will kick the problems haunting their lives.

The Tarrant County chapter of Texas Lawyers for Texas Veterans, a non-profit group, was launched in 2010 and to date has served more than 1,500 veterans. The demand for help continues increasing. At the Tarrant County clinics, a veteran can get a free legal consultation regardless of income. Volunteer attorneys who appreciate the sacrifices, some of whom are also veterans, understand how important it is to help the men and women who served our country in the many conflicts and wars, some of which are ongoing. In a KERA article, “Tarrant County Legal Clinic Helps Veterans,” there is a nice write up and imbedded audio story on point.

To learn more about the Texas Lawyers for Texas Veterans, Tarrant County Chapter, you may visit their website and find them on Facebook and Twitter. See also a promotional video.

The Barrows Firm shares important information and legal resources for veterans. If you need assistance with a matter involving a veteran in need of help, The Barrows Firm can direct you to the right people and organizations.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

 

October is National Domestic Violence Month 
 

In 2015, there were 192,872 incidents of family violence in Texas, and 158 women were killed. There were 183,294 domestic violence hotline calls. While 24,391 adults and children were safely sheltered, the statistics tell us 15,869 requests for shelter were unmet.[i] In some cases, victims of domestic violence can make and carry out a plan to get away from their abuser, but in far too many others, there is no time to prepare until it is too late. With increased education and awareness of domestic violence, people have a better chance of identifying abusive behaviors and the signs that problems are escalating. In any emergency situation, the best bet is to have a plan and hope you never need it.

Texas law recognizes and protects men, women and children.

Men, women and children, at all ages, and from all walks of life, can be family violence victims. Texas law defines family violence as well as dating violence, and it is important to recognize that you do not need to be married to be protected by Texas law.

Family violence is defined in the Texas Family Code as:

“(1) An act by a member of a family or household against another member of the family or household that is intended to result in physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or sexual assault or that is a threat that reasonably places the member in fear of imminent physical harm, bodily injury, assault, or sexual assault, but does not include defensive measures to protect oneself;

(2) abuse, as that term is defined by Sections 261.001(1)(C), (E), (G), (H), (I), (J), and (K), by a member of a family or household toward a child of the family or household; or

(3) dating violence, as that term is defined by Section 71.0021.[ii]

When an individual reports family violence to a law enforcement officer, either during an incident when they dial 911, or soon after, the Texas Criminal Code requires that officers investigate all disturbance reports. In the process, the officer must notify a victim about their rights as victims of family violence. These rights include the request for a protective order from the court, and the right to ask a local prosecutor to file a criminal complaint against the abuser.[iii]

When the reports and records are filed with the court, a judge can make a finding that family violence is or is likely to occur, and issue a protective order that legally prohibits the accused person from engaging in certain acts and may restrict the distance and contact among the accused and potential violence victims. If the accused violates the protective order, they may be immediately arrested and taken to jail. A protective order, while something of leverage, is not a bullet proof vest, and victims should be on heightened alert and maintain a plan in the event of an emergency.

Spotting the signs that point to a family violence threat is important to making safe choices.

Abusers focus on their ability to control their victims. An abuser may act hostile or threatening during verbal fights. They may apologize profusely and have many reasons for their inappropriate anger. So long as they can contain the situation and keep it private, the abuser maintains control. If, however, an upset spouse or significant other seeks attention from other people, especially family members, the abuser may become more angered. An abusive person might move a family great distances from the ones to whom they may run, in the event of an emergency. Abusers may also monitor others’ use of cell phones and other communication technologies to keep an eye on or limit communication outside the abuser’s control. When people are isolated from friends and family they can feel trapped and powerless.

When do people snap? When are we once bitten, twice shy? These are difficult questions for anyone to answer. A better question is whether we feel absolutely safe or wonder if someone is going to lose it and what may happen. In cases involving serious injury and death, the victims did not always see an attack coming, until it was too late.

Where do people go when they leave, and what do they do if they have no money?

Since many abusers actively limit their victims access to personal and financial support, it can be difficult to leave. Some victims find a way to save an emergency fund of money, possibly in cash or untraceable pre-paid debit cards. Some victims with no family or friends with whom to take shelter, may use the computer at the local library to look for safe places to go. While some victims fear their abuser might look for them at local shelters, some find underground or privately networked safe homes.

It may be an interesting conversation among friends and family to talk about what they might do to escape a violent relationship and where they would go. Everything down to avoiding social media may be part of a plan of action. Even people in the best relationships are wise to realize that someday they might have to escape an abuser or help a victim escape theirs. Knowing where to turn and who to call can include the name and number of a family law attorney who can help victims take action and safety measures. Including that attorney in a “what if” conversation may not be a bad idea.

Remember, if you sense or see something, discretely inquire or say something. You might fear that saying something may offend your friend or family member, but in the event you are correct, speaking up and just letting another know you are there whenever they may need you can save a life.

The Barrows Firm shares important information and resources about family law. If you need assistance with a matter involving family violence, The Barrows Firm can help answer your questions.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] Texas Council on Family Violence, 2015 Family Violence by the Numbers.

[ii] Texas Family Code, Section 71.004, Family Violence.

[iii] Texas Criminal Code, Chapter 5, Family Violence Prevention.

The Barrows Firm Sponsors Southlake Oktoberfest 2016 
 

FORT WORTH – Oct. 7, 2016 –The Barrows Firm, P.C. in Fort Worth, Texas, is a contributing sponsor of Southlake Oktoberfest 2016, offered by the Southlake Chamber of Commerce on October 7 – 9, 2016 at Southlake Town Square.

Oktoberfest is a seasonal signature event for the Southlake Chamber. Leslie Barrows is a member of the Southlake Chamber where she is also on the board of directors. In connection with The Barrows Firm sponsorship of the Oktoberfest event, the firm produced a public service announcement video that will be featured in rotation with videos by other sponsors.

The Barrows Firm Oktoberfest PSA video reminds festival attendees to plan ahead for the event by choosing a designated driver, planning ahead to meet at a certain time and place if you get separated from your group, and being aware of your surroundings with the well-known suggestion that if you see something, say something.

Click/tap here to watch the video

“How to speak Texan in German” is a focus of The Barrows Firm video that translates popular phrases and sayings from Texan to German, including “Howdy y’all,” “Good morning,” “Evening y’all,” “Bye now,” “How about them Cowboys,” “Fixin to,” “Hissy fit,” “Do you speak English?” and “Don’t mess with Texas.”

The Southlake Chamber of Commerce website dedicated to its Oktoberfest event states that this is the 15th anniversary of the Oktoberfest being hosted by the Chamber. Located at the Southlake Town Square, 100,000 people are expected to visit throughout the weekend. Parking and admission are free and the event takes place Friday, October 7, 2016 from 5 p.m. and runs through Sunday, October 9, 2016 at 5 p.m. On Friday and Saturday evening, Southlake Oktoberfest is open until 11 p.m.

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About The Barrows Firm

The Barrows Firm is located downtown Fort Worth at 500 East Belknap Street, near the Tarrant County Courthouse and the Tarrant County Family Law Center. If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and on Avvo.com.