Adoptions Attorney Leslie Barrows
What may happen when a minor child is involved in the juvenile justice system in Texas 
 

When minor children in Texas aged 10 to 17 are charged with criminal offenses they are prosecuted in the juvenile justice system. In 2011, the Texas Juvenile Justice Department (TJJD) was formed to combine the rehabilitation services of two formerly separate agencies, the Texas Youth Commission and the Texas Juvenile Probation Commission. The goal of the Texas legislature and the TJJD is to manage a unified state juvenile justice agency with effective comprehensive programs and services for offenders from the point of first contact through the termination of probation and supervision.

A TJJD board of directors is appointed by the governor to better serve and rehabilitate minor offenders with the hope that they learn from their mistakes and do not reoffend and return to the justice system as adults. As many believe, all kids are good and some make mistakes, they are all worth the time and effort of the TJJD and the professionals who play important roles in the process of rehabilitating minors in trouble.

An overview of juvenile prosecution:

When law enforcement arrests and detains a minor with the suspicion for criminal offenses, the juvenile prosecuting attorney reviews the arresting officer statements and evidence and determines if an individual should be prosecuted. In the juvenile system, the official charging document is called a petition. An assistant district or county attorney may also serve as a juvenile prosecuting attorney.

Depending on the nature of the offense and circumstances, a minor may be referred to juvenile court to be informally admonished and sent home, or the juvenile prosecuting attorney files a petition to charge the minor.

The petition is a charge of delinquent conduct which includes offenses that when committed by adults could be punished by confinement to a jail or prison. Conduct that only applies to youth, such as truancy or conduct that would only result in a fine for an adult, such as speeding, is referred to as conduct in need of supervision (CINS) in the juvenile system. If the juvenile court makes a finding, called an adjudication that a minor engaged in delinquent or CINS conduct, the same is like a conviction in adult court.

If a minor receives a petition for an adjudication there is a formal court procedure like that in adult criminal courts. Minors have rights and hire attorneys to represent them during the juvenile justice process. It is important to obtain a skilled juvenile law attorney to defend a juvenile facing a criminal record which could significantly affect their future.

If adjudicated, there are several possible outcomes:

The court weighs the circumstances of cases and the evidence presented by the attorneys to determine an appropriate sentence for the juvenile offender. In many cases where the juvenile is does not have a record and simply made a mistake, they may be released and placed on probation, which must be discharged by the time the juvenile turns 18 years of age.

In more serious matters which may also involve repeat offenders the juvenile may be sent to the TJJD to serve their sentence which may be a determined amount of time or it could also be an indeterminate sentence. Like juvenile probation, those juveniles sent to a TJJD facility on a determined sentence are discharged when they turn 19 years of age. Juveniles given indeterminate sentences, however, may be transferred to an adult prison, which depends on the individual’s behavior and progress in the TJJD programs.

Even if a juvenile must serve time at TJJD, the focus remains on making sure that juvenile stays out of the court system as an adult and does not become a recurring offender.

The purpose of TJJD programs focused on the growth and maturity of juvenile offenders is to help minors in the juvenile system learn that they have an option to control their behavior and conduct to prevent themselves from reoffending and eventually becoming institutionalized. The overseeing TJJD state board of directors develops policies and programs to best attend to the needs of juveniles who need extra assistance and support in developing their mental and emotional maturity.

About Us: For more please contact The Barrows Firm in Southlake at (817) 481-1583.

If you would like additional information about this content, need to hire an attorney, please call The Barrows Firm at (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located at 700 East Southlake Boulevard in Southlake near the Town Square.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

Confrontation Clause: Fort Worth’s 2nd District Court of appeals reverses sex assault conviction 
 

In a recent Second District Court of Appeals ruling in Fort Worth, the court majority reversed a defendant’s sexual assault convictions based on arguments made to the appellate court that the trial court judge violated his constitutional rights by not allowing him to confront his accusers, specifically restricting his cross examination of two witnesses for the prosecution.

The Confrontation Clause of the Sixth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution provides, “In all criminal prosecutions, the accused shall enjoy the right to a speedy and public trial, by an impartial jury of the state and district wherein the crime shall have been committed, which district shall have been previously ascertained by law, and to be informed of the nature and cause of the accusation; to be confronted with the witnesses against him; to have compulsory process for obtaining witnesses in his favor, and to have the assistance of counsel for his defense.[i]

Defendant’s constitutional claims

At issue was the preservation of the defendant’s constitutional claims and arguments. The minority dissenting justices noted in the opinion that the defendant did not make or preserve any constitutional arguments about confronting the prosecution witnesses at the trial court level and not until the filing of his appeal following his sexual assault conviction.

During trial, the court restricted the defendant’s cross examination of the sexual assault complainant regarding patient treatment. The exchange is as follows:

“[DEFENSE COUNSEL]: Judge, we would submit that all of this testimony is relevant and should come before the jury so the jury can get the whole picture of the situation. So . . . we’d like to ask these questions in front of the jury.

[THE STATE]: Your Honor, we’d object as hearsay. Also, it is not relevant to anything related to the elements in this case. Also, it should not be admissible under 404. Argue none of it should be admissible.

THE COURT: Sorry. I didn’t hear that last part.

[THE STATE]: Under 404, it should not be admissible. And also, additionally, I stated — I believe it’s hearsay and not relevant.

THE COURT: I sustain the objection.[ii]

Similarly, the trial court limited the defendant’s opportunity to cross examine the nurse who examined the alleged victim:

“[DEFENSE COUNSEL]: The State has asked this witness about her report as to the past medical history given to her by the victim, and she repeated several things about the patient’s history that was given to her by [the complainant]. Included in that report and part of the past medical history is that she was taking Xanax and Zoloft and that she had been suffering from anxiety as a current condition and also that she had a chronic problem with herpes. That is all in the medical report. . . . So I think the State has opened the door to discussing the rest of the medical history.

THE COURT: And specifically what are you trying to get into?

[DEFENSE COUNSEL]: The fact that she — all of it, Your Honor. It’s on the —

THE COURT: Let me hear it for the record. What is it you’re trying to get into?

[DEFENSE COUNSEL]: That [the complainant] was taking Xanax and Zoloft, that she had current problems with anxiety, and that she had a chronic problem of herpes.

THE COURT: Response?

[THE STATE]: Yes, Your Honor…. I think they’re trying to elaborate on something that wasn’t asked of this witness. And besides that, they’re still trying to get into 404 information, relevance of this information, other than to basically smear this victim’s character, which isn’t acceptable at this time. That violates 404. So we continue our objections. We do not believe the door has been opened.[iii]

The trial court sustained the prosecution’s objection to the scope of defendant’s intended cross examination of the witnesses.

The opinion is a good read and there is an explanation of the preservation rule which generally states that if you don’t make a constitutional claim or argument during trial, it should not be allowed on appeal.

Despite arguments that the defendant failed to make proper confrontation clause claims during his trial, a majority of appellate court justices agreed that the defendant had been denied his right to due process of law and thus the sexual assault conviction cannot stand and must be overturned.

About Us: For more information please contact The Barrows Firm in Southlake at (817) 481-1583.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located at 700 East Southlake Boulevard in Southlake near the Town Square.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

 

[i] Confrontation Clause, U.S. Constitution, VI Amendment.

[ii] Joshua Golliday v. The State of Texas, Court of Appeals, Second District, No.: 02-15-00416-CR

[iii] See HNii above.

UPDATE AND CHANGE OF DIRECTION RE: Local Texas law enforcement will start paying DPS for forensic crime lab analysis 
 

UPDATE – July 28, 2017. On behalf of Texas DPS, Deputy Director of Homeland Security & Services, Mr. Robert J. Bodisch notified statewide law enforcement and prosecutors that at the request of Governor Abbott and agreement of legislative leaders that DPS reverse the decision to charge fees for forensic analysis of physical evidence. Now, DPS will continue providing forensic crime lab services at no cost to law enforcement agencies.

Original article dated July 27, 2017:

Insisting the change in the state budget, Texas lawmakers shifted the cost of state crime lab analysis to local law enforcement to help lower property taxes. Prior to the new fees going into effect this fall, state crime lab services had been available to city and county law enforcement free of charge. The new fees are projected to make up more than 15 percent of the state crime lab budget. A voucher system, still being negotiated, should benefit police and sheriff departments as they adjust their local budgets to accommodate the new fees for lab work to investigate DNA, toxicology and evidence of alcohol and controlled substances. Some say law enforcement may need to use greater discretion in cases where ordering forensic analysis will come with a price tag.

DPS fees for crime lab forensic analysis:

  • “DNA testing will cost cities and counties $550 per test;
  • Toxicology tests, such as for DWI enforcement and homicide cases, will cost $150;
  • Alcohol and controlled substance analysis will cost $75 per test.[i]

The new fees, included in the Texas crime lab budget for the coming year are expected to be $11.5 million, just more than 15 percent of the projected $74.5 million budget. The current budget is $74.6.[ii]

How will local police and sheriff departments respond to the new crime lab fees?

Individual departments will need to determine how the new DPS fees for forensic analysis affects their budgets. According to the WFAA article on point, “Police departments in North Texas, which use the state crime labs, said they have not yet heard of the new costs and are unsure if there will be an amount easily absorbed or whether they will have to ask taxpayers for more money.[iii]

A thought crossing the mind of many criminal defense attorneys is whether some law enforcement may become selective in which cases they subjectively determine it is worth the money to order blood, toxicology and DNA testing. Smaller police departments with smaller budgets are likely to feel the greatest impact of the new budget holding them accountable for the cost of lab work.

Will a state voucher program alleviate burdens on law enforcement budgets?

Still being finalized, the state is implementing a voucher system that each department can apply to some of the crime lab services. If for example, as a matter of policy, DWI arrests and charges are a high priority in law enforcement, there may be more access to voucher funds from state revenues.

Vouchers, while helpful financial aid, may be limited. There will likely be police and sheriff departments forced to make budget cuts that could affect the delivery of law enforcement services. Fewer officers could be patrolling small towns and rural counties if other funds are not budgeted to cover the new forensic lab fees that will be charged by DPS as of September 1, 2017.

For more information please contact The Barrows Firm in Southlake at (817) 481-1583.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located at 700 East Southlake Boulevard in Southlake near the Town Square.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] WFAA 8 ABC, Police, sheriffs must soon pay to use state crime labs, by Jason Whitely, July 20, 2017.

[ii] See HNi above

[iii] See HNii above.

Taking advantage of the qualified IRS Child Tax Credit 
 

For each eligible qualifying child, you may receive the Child Tax Credit, up to $1,000. For married couples with children and single parents and separated or divorcees, there is a list of seven tests that must be passed to be entitled to claim the tax credit for each allowed dependent child.

The IRS website offers an interactive Tax Assistant application to help you discover whether you may qualify for any available Child Tax Credits – Is My Child a Qualifying Child for the Child Tax Credit?

Meanwhile, these are the seven tests, copied from IRS Tax Tip 2017-11, February 8, 2017:

Child Tax Credit Qualifications[i]:

  • “Age. The child must have been under age 17 on Dec. 31, 2016.
  • Relationship. The child must be the taxpayer’s son, daughter, stepchild, foster child, brother, sister, stepbrother, stepsister, half-brother or half-sister. The child may be a descendant of any of these individuals. A qualifying child could also include grandchildren, nieces or nephews. Taxpayers would always treat an adopted child as their own. An adopted child includes a child lawfully placed with them for legal adoption.
  • Support. The child must have not provided more than half of their own support for the year.
  • Dependent. The child must be a dependent that a taxpayer claims on their federal tax return.
  • Joint return. The child cannot file a joint return for the year, unless the only reason they are filing is to claim a refund.
  • Citizenship. The child must be a U.S. citizen, a U.S. national or a U.S. resident alien.
  • Residence. In most cases, the child must have lived with the taxpayer for more than half of 2016.”

The next step in determining eligibility for qualified Child Tax Credits is to determine whether the income limitations eliminate the taxpayer’s opportunity to receive Child Tax Credits due to their filing status and income.

For some taxpayers, the Additional Child Tax Credit applies; “If a taxpayer qualifies and gets less than the full Child Tax Credit, they could receive a refund, even if they owe not tax.[ii]

As the IRS code may change from year to year, make sure to contact your tax professional and the IRS website for update tax credit information. The IRS page with the Child Tax Credit Tips contains additional tax schedule, E-file and publication information.

To learn more about tax issues and financial aspects of divorce and family law matters, contact The Barrows Firm in Southlake for additional information.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., attorneys and mediators, please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located at 700 East Southlake Boulevard in Southlake near the Town Square.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] IRS Website, Five Things to Know About the Child Tax Credit, IRS Tax Tip 2017-11, February 8, 2017.

[ii] See HNi above.

PODCAST: What happens if you must serve time in jail or prison? 

This is The Barrows Firm Law Review, a monthly Internet radio show podcast featuring information about Texas law and events that affect families and the community of attorneys and professionals who serve them. What happens if you must serve time in jail or prison? Choosing a custodian to manage your affairs while you are unavailable; […]

5 reasons to give mediation a chance 
 

Mediation is an alternative dispute resolution process with several benefits to the parties to divorce who take advantage of the opportunity to come to agreement on certain terms of the divorce so that the truly contested issues may be better defined. Parties to a divorce may elect to take part in mediation and as well the court may order mediation during the state of pre-trial negotiation. The alternative to mediation may be the attorneys corresponding back and forth to come to agreement on certain issues, or proceeding in the regular course of litigation and resolving otherwise agreeable issues in court. Alternatively, mediation can save everyone’s time and resources so that the litigation process can be limited to the strongly contested issues, such as child custody. Many attorneys are trained and certified in mediation, where their role is not to zealously advocate, but to facilitate the dispute resolution process. In this article, we highlight five benefits of settling agreeable issues in mediation.

5 reasons to give mediation a chance:

  1. Instead of focusing on the past, look to the future;

When in divorce court and in divorce litigation pleadings, the allegations and focus are on what already happened and what it may mean in the divorce. Mediation is different because the focus is on what each party really wants and needs to move forward. A short conversation can lead to an understanding about what means the most to each party in the divorce.

  1. Increase goodwill and commit to positive relations with your soon-to-be ex;

During a mediation, the parties are present with their lawyers and the mediator in a neutral setting in which they can all work together. Observing one another discussing issues that may be settled out of court can lead to better feelings and avoid the situation where they are otherwise reading court documents and imagining the worst intentions of someone they previously loved and married.

  1. Flexible and creative problem-solving processes make mediation adaptive;

Mediation does not need to follow a specific and limited procedure. Different mediators use unique approaches to talk about the reality of the divorce process to drive people to understanding their bottom line and what issues are most important and which can be negotiated and settled.

  1. Parties in mediation can speak directly to negotiate agreeable issues;

In traditional pre-trial litigation, negotiations take place among the lawyers and their clients in an adversary process. If one party has a question about why the other is seeking possession of certain property or alleging assets are not part of the community property, the other may only respond through their attorney. In mediation, however, you can ask the other party right then and there if what they seek is a top priority or something they may be able to negotiate.

  1. Participants save time and money.

The amount of correspondence back and forth during the pre-trial discovery and litigation process can absorb significant time and resources. Likewise, resolving contested issues in court can lead to increased time and expense. Mediation saves the parties time, and time is money. In a few hours or sessions of mediation, the parties can reach and sign an agreement that resolves the agreeable issues so that the focus in litigation can be the top priority issues to which the parties absolutely cannot come to an agreement.

To learn more about mediation and how the alternative dispute resolution process may be a fit in your divorce, contact The Barrows Firm for additional information.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., attorneys and mediators, please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located at 700 East Southlake Boulevard in Southlake near the Town Square.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

Attack on cyber-bullying: David’s Law helps students, parents, teachers and law enforcement 
 

Unfortunate tragedy can lead to new laws, policies and a hope that a future tragedy is more preventable. When a 16-year-old boy takes his own life after vicious online bullying it became the dubious topic of discussion among Texas lawmakers. Online bullying has been a new problem for parents and educators who may not have foreseen the way today’s children respond to bullying on social media apps, text messages and similar means of electronic communication. Recently signed into law by Governor Abbott, David’s Law creates new rights and duties among schools, law enforcement, parents and students to more aggressively recognize and address instances of cyber threats and bullying.

Texas lawmakers working to keep our laws current and relevant

When Texas District 26 Senator, José Menéndez, issued a press release about the new legislation to prevent and combat cyberbullying in Texas schools, he emphasized that, “Texas laws need to keep pace with evolving technology. Students like David Molak and Matt Vasquez were being harassed and threatened on social media and not in the gym locker room.[i]

The other boy mentioned in the press release, Matt Vasquez, was also a victim of cyber bullying and was harassed online and told to kill himself; he was being bullied for having leukemia. Luckily, Matt Vasquez found the help he needed to recover from the abuse. David Molak was not as lucky.

Online bullying: A sobering reality in present times

Lawmakers supporting anti-cyber bullying legislation appreciate the stark contrast between bullying in years past versus the electronically socially networked culture today. Instead of a few students witnessing bullying and telling others on the bus, today the bully doesn’t need to lay a finger on the student, instead creating an online threat or attack that can go viral among students and beyond before the children make it home on the bus.

With a social media aggressor hiding behind a keyboard and screen, even adults are subjected to online threats and bullying, the like we were not used to witnessing as grownups. The difference between adults and children can be night and day, however, with the amount of time we spend on social media, its real importance in our lives, and our mental and emotional maturity to handle a cyber bully.

Highlights of David’s Law: Policies, procedures, rights and duties to aggressively address cyber bullying:

  • It is a misdemeanor crime to harass or bully anyone under the age of 18 by use of text messaging, social media and similar social networking applications;
  • Schools are required to create cyber bullying policies and must notify the parents or guardians of any aggressor engaged in threatening or bullying another;
  • Anonymous systems for reporting threats or bullying to school district authorities;
  • Independent school districts have greater ability to investigate off-campus bullying in certain circumstances, with the aid of law enforcement cooperation;
  • Options for disciplinary alternative educational programs and expulsions are available based on the severity of the online threats or bullying, such as telling another to commit suicide;
  • Increased counseling and rehabilitative services shall be available for both victims and aggressors.

As the new law takes place, September 1 this year, there will likely be more information to share about the policies and procedures being implemented and how and where the impacts of the new law will be measured. If you have any questions about the new law or concerns about online threats and bullying, call The Barrows Firm.

For more information about protective orders in Texas and about family violence and divorce, please do not hesitate to contact The Barrows Firm in Southlake at (817) 481-1583.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located at 700 East Southlake Boulevard in Southlake near the Town Square.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

 

[i] Press Release: The Senate of the State of Texas, Senator José Menéndez Dist. 26, David’s Law

CPS reform bills signed into law 
 

Following the ongoing work of dedicated teams of professionals and lawmakers, Governor Abbott recently signed four bills into law, bringing widely anticipated reform to the Texas Department of Family Protective Services (DFPS) and its investigatory department, Child Protective Services (CPS). The new laws help cure long-term ailments in child protection and foster care with needed funding, department independence, procedural enhancements and a community-oriented foster care system. The CPS reform bills address many shortcomings that cast a shadow on the child welfare system in Texas.

Texas DFPS and CPS reform bill highlights:

House Bill 4

The economic and psychological needs of children are addressed in House Bill 4 which provides monthly financial assistance for families paying the living expenses for foster children with whom they are related. Too often, relatives who could be the foster parents for children born of family members fear financial burdens. The monthly financial assistance set forth in House Bill 4 encourages positive mental health, keeping foster children within their relatives.

House Bill 5

Independence and relative autonomy is the focus of House Bill 5 which allows DFPS to create rules and policies the department determines are in the best interests of the foster children and families it serves. The department answers to directly to the office of the Governor under House Bill 5. The effect of increased DFPS independence is more efficient resolution and action in cases involving neglect and the medical needs of children. The new laws take effect this September.

House Bill 7

Procedural changes to the foster care system in Texas are allowed through House Bill 7. The changes include requirements that allegations of abuse or neglect are based on factual evidence, guidelines for not separating parents from children for non-violent misdemeanor crimes, and limits on courts ordering mental health treatment without the advice of healthcare professionals.

Senate Bill 11  

Community based child rearing is the goal of Senate Bill 11, keeping foster children placed with a family in the same school district and near their familiar friends and neighborhoods. The uncertainty and disruption involved in moving children to foster homes in unfamiliar settings can be detrimental to a child’s mental and emotional health and development. Senate Bill 11 includes local non-profit organizations as well as church communities by giving them the ability to oversee and mange cases in the Texas foster children system.

CPS reform was a top priority for Governor Abbott

Delivering the State of the State address this January, Governor Abbott stated, “If we ever had an emergency item, this is it. And I’m declaring CPS reform my first emergency item. If you do nothing else this session, cast a vote for the life of a child.[i]

Speaking about foster care, the governor encouragingly proclaimed that when it is done right, the foster care system can lead to tremendous results. Talking about families with open hearts and homes, Abbott mentioned Texas First Lady and others reaching out to community faith leaders and legions of families who may be best suited to foster our more vulnerable children in Texas.

If you want to learn more about becoming a foster parent or if you want to adopt your foster child now or later, contact The Barrows Firm to learn more.

For more information about protective orders in Texas and about family violence and divorce, please do not hesitate to contact The Barrows Firm in Southlake at (817) 481-1583.

If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583. The Barrows Firm is located at 700 East Southlake Boulevard in Southlake near the Town Square.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn. To read client endorsements and reviews of Attorney, Leslie Barrows, please visit her Avvo.com profile.

[i] Office of the Texas Governor, Governor Abbott Delivers State Of The State Address, Jan. 31, 2017, Austin, Texas

Divorce Podcast: As school lets out for the summer; keep kids safe and out of trouble 

This is The Barrows Firm Law Review, a monthly Internet radio show podcast featuring information about Texas law and events that affect families and the community of attorneys and professionals who serve them. As school lets out for the summer; keep kids safe and out of trouble Great ways to keep children busy while introducing […]

Leslie Barrows receives James Barlow “Big Heart” Award at TCBA Bench Bar 2017 
 

SOUTHLAKE, TEXAS – May 10, 2017 – Attorney Leslie Barrows of The Barrows Firm, P.C. in Southlake, Texas, received the James Barlow “Big Heart” Award at Tarrant County Bar Association (TCBA) Bench Bar Conference. Barrows, Chair of this year’s Bench Bar Committee, presented a warm welcoming and opening remarks along with Jim Pruitt, Mayor of Rockwall.

Every year at the Bench Bar Conference, an attendee is selected to receive the Barlow “Big Heart” Award, in the memory of James B. Barlow, a loyal Bench Bar supporter and attendee. Barlow was well-known and liked for being a positive role model for the TCBA members attending Bench Bar. He worked diligently to promote positive relationships among attorneys and judges at the annual conference.

The TCBA Bench Bar Conference was held at the Hilton Lakefront in Rockwall, Texas, April 28-30, 2017. The conference provides an opportunity for networking among members of the bar and members of the bench. Bench Bar features sponsored events. This year, attendees had the opportunity to enjoy a Murder Mystery Dinner and a Saturday Golf Tournament. On Friday and Saturday, Bench Bar attendees had attended several substantive presentations with MCLE credits available, including ethics credits.

For more information about the TCBA and the annual Bench Bar Conference, please do not hesitate to contact The Barrows Firm.

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About The Barrows Firm

The Barrows Firm is located near the Southlake Town Square at 700 East Southlake Boulevard, Suite 170, Southlake, Texas. If you would like more information about The Barrows Firm, P.C., please contact the firm by calling (817) 481-1583.

You can follow The Barrows Firm on social media and find important articles and resources about Texas law and how it may affect you or your family. The Barrows Firm is on Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn and on Avvo.com.